PROGRESS REPORT

Working Together for

Wind and Wildlife Solutions

May 2016

Letter From the Executive Director: Abby Arnold

The Need for Solutions is More Urgent than Ever

When I think back to when AWWI was just getting off the ground eight years ago, my heart races a little. It was clear that wind power was gaining momentum like never before, and there was heartfelt commitment to address the risks to wildlife so that wind power could achieve its potential. There was promise in collaboration– we had to solve this.

Today, wind power has gained even more momentum than we could have anticipated. Wind now produces about 6% of our nation’s electricity. By 2020, the U.S. Department of Energy lays out a vision for wind power to provide 10% of America’s electrical demands, 20% by 2030 and 35% by 2050. Recent federal policy will help the United States achieve this potential.

Building on the founders’ vision, AWWI has greatly expanded the knowledge, tools, and practices available to avoid, minimize, and offset the effects of wind energy development on wildlife and their habitat.

For example, our Landscape Assessment Tool, developed with The Nature Conservancy, allows wind developers and government agencies to screen potential wildlife and habitat conflicts early in the prospecting process. The Eagle Research Framework, developed with internationally recognized eagle experts, identifies the best approach to minimizing eagle fatalities at wind facilities and offers an effective model to promote coexistence with wildlife as we develop renewable energy.

We also directly support research on eagles, bats, and grouse species and share results in publications so all can benefit from the newest techniques and solutions. Of course, guiding all of our work is AWWI’s unique and powerful collaborative approach, which brings together the wind industry, wildlife management agencies, and science and environmental organizations around a shared agenda for wind and conservation.

Yet there is much more we need to do – and quickly. With your support, we can expand and deepen scientific analysis to gain new insights into wind-wildlife interactions and develop strategies to mitigate wildlife impacts. With your help, we can test technology to detect and deter species at wind projects.

If you’re reading this letter, you too feel a sense of urgency to achieve the promise wind power provides to deliver clean, cost-efficient domestic energy while protecting our wildlife and their habitat. Together, we can scale up wind power while placing a premium on wildlife conservation and making our planet a more livable place for generations to come.

So whether you helped to found AWWI back in 2008 or are brand new to our work, I urge you to please join us in taking on this critical challenge. And to the many generous individuals, nonprofit organizations, and companies that have made possible everything you will read about in this progress report, you have my deepest gratitude.

Sincerely,

abby

Abby Arnold

Executive Director, American Wind Wildlife Institute

Abby Arnold

Executive Director

American Wind Wildlife Institute

jamie-quote

“We don’t have to choose between renewable energy and wildlife to address climate change. AWWI provides us a forum to achieve wind and wildlife co-existence through its collaborative efforts to find workable and innovative solutions.”

Jamie Rappaport Clark

President and CEO, Defenders of Wildlife

From the Founders

Building a New Model Based on Collaboration and Conservation

As founding members of the American Wind Wildlife Institute, we’re so proud of how far this organization has come since its formation in 2008 and the huge impact AWWI is having today.

AWWI was born out of the shared vision that, unlike any energy source before it, more clean energy and better conservation outcomes could coexist if we worked together: wind companies, environmental organizations, scientists, and government agencies.

The founders envisioned forging a new model for the growth of the renewable industry, one built on a foundation of genuine collaboration, proactive action, conservation principles, and credible science.

Getting here hasn’t been easy. Building trust among stakeholders was challenging from the start. Some questioned whether it was even possible to structure AWWI in a way that would ensure that decision-making was shared and equal, and produce valid, independent science that was accepted by all. Slowly but surely, though, we built the trust and relationships that now power AWWI’s work.

Today, AWWI has united stakeholders around a strategic conservation agenda, something many thought could never happen. AWWI is also guiding the way on some of the most leading edge research and innovative solutions to address the risks of wind to wildlife.

Wind power is an essential part of a more sustainable future, especially in the face of climate change. We can – and must – expand wind power quickly while also protecting wildlife and their habitat. AWWI is making this possible today and into the future.

There are so many people to thank for bringing AWWI to fruition and ensuring our success to date. Many individuals, organizations, companies, and agencies took a leap of faith with us, and we are deeply grateful for their leadership. A heartfelt thanks goes to all the founders (and funders) who helped us during the critical, early stages of AWWI’s evolution.

The bold idea many of us shared at the inception of the American Wind Wildlife Institute is now a reality thanks to the foresight of everyone who has been a part of our efforts over these past eight years. Thank you!

Peter C. Frumhoff, Ph.D.

Director of Science and Policy

Union of Concerned Scientists

Jeff Vonk

Department Secretary

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks

Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies (retired)

Johanna Wald

Senior Attorney

Natural Resources Defense Council (retired)

James Walker, Ph.D.

Board Vice Chairman

EDF Renewable Energy

Wayne Walker

Principal

Common Ground Capital

“It’s very clear that building wind energy at a significant scale must be part of the climate solution, and we need to do that in a way that protects wildlife in their habitat. We have to succeed.”

Peter C. Frumhoff, Ph.D.

Director of Science and Policy, Union of Concerned Scientists  

Milestones

Defining Achievements Since AWWI’s Founding

“The wind industry has been built upon a legacy of caring for our environment and wildlife. As the biggest, fastest, and cheapest way to reduce atmospheric carbon pollution, the wind industry plays a vital role in addressing climate change, which leading scientists and many in the conservation community view as the single greatest threat to wildlife globally. Within this framework, AWWI acts as a valuable convener, platform, and research effort for the wind industry and the conservation community to collaboratively identify solutions for responsibly deploying significant amounts of wind energy.”

Tom Kiernan

CEO, American Wind Energy Association

Research in Action

Eagles and Wind Energy: Helping Both Soar

Taber Allison, Ph.D., AWWI’s Director of Research and Evaluation, shares his insider perspective on how the organization’s collaborative, science-based eagle work has led to breakthrough solutions.

When I first started at AWWI in December 2010, eagles quickly rose to the top of our nascent research agenda. No matter who I talked to – whether from wind companies, environmental organizations, or agencies – eagles always came up. In all of those conversations, everyone was united in wanting new solutions to reconcile wind energy development with eagle conservation. Yet it was unclear what these solutions might be, and the differing perspectives of the stakeholders added to the challenge.

In 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service) issued a new rule for the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (the ‘Eagle Rule’), and in early 2011 the Service released the first version of the Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance describing how the wind industry could voluntarily comply with that rule.

At meetings with AWWI’s wind industry partners, it was clear that complying with the Eagle Rule was going to be a major challenge. The Service’s model predicting eagle take was very conservative; I concluded that most projects in the U.S. would need a permit or be at legal risk. However, there were no approved methods for minimizing take of eagles and the only option for offsetting eagle take was retrofitting of power poles…Continue Reading

Taber Allison, Ph.D.

Director of Research and Evaluation

American Wind Wildlife Institute

“Developing credible compensatory mitigation measures has been a major challenge to permitting take of golden eagles at wind facilities. Reducing manageable forms of existing mortality is the key to permitting some new unavoidable take at wind facilities without increasing the likelihood golden eagle populations will decline. This is a very difficult task. AWWI has taken a leading role in this effort, using expert elicitation and adaptive statistical approaches to develop both the methods and the measurement tools needed to implement innovative mitigation to support golden eagle take permits.”

Brian Millsap

National Raptor Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Research in Action

Building a Better Understanding of Migratory Bats

Taber Allison, Ph.D., AWWI’s Director of Research and Evaluation, sat down with bat researcher Erin Baerwald, Ph.D., an AWWI post-doctoral research fellow, to discuss their cutting-edge research on bat-wind interactions.

About Taber Allison, Ph.D.: Taber is an internationally recognized ecologist and leading expert in wind-wildlife impacts. He joined AWWI in 2010 to direct all research initiatives, and serves as a Science Advisor to the Bats and Wind Energy Cooperative (BWEC) and a board member of The Wildlife Society’s Renewable Energy Working Group.

About Erin Baerwald, Ph.D.: When Taber sought a top-notch bat scientist to expand AWWI’s research, Erin was quickly identified – and represents the next generation of scientific leadership in the wind-wildlife field. Erin completed her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary in 2015 and began working with AWWI last fall. Erin was awarded the 2014 William T. Hornaday Award from the American Society of Mammalogists for her bat research.

Taber: What led to your interest in bats?

Erin: As an undergrad, my first field biology job was catching bats for a population genetics research project. It was amazing to get up-close-and-personal with members of this nocturnal world that exists all around us and that we so rarely see. I was hooked.

Taber: What led you to focus your research specifically on bat-wind interactions?

Erin: Right around the time I was exploring research ideas for my master’s, an unexpectedly large number of bats were killed at a new wind energy facility in southern Alberta, Canada. The operators of the site approached my advisor, Dr. Robert Barclay, and we began working with the operators to better understand the issue and develop mitigation strategies. This line of research proved critically important, challenging, and fascinating; I can’t imagine doing anything else now…Continue Reading

Erin Baerwald, Ph.D.

Research Fellow

American Wind Wildlife Institute

Taber Allison, Ph.D.

Director of Research and Evaluation

American Wind Wildlife Institute

“AWWI has done something that many of us wouldn’t have thought possible: develop the relevant science that is widely accepted by the wind industry, environmental organizations, and agencies. This science provides the basis for creating and improving the policies and practices that are solving wind and wildlife conflicts.”

Mike Garland

CEO, Pattern Energy Group Inc.

Partners in Action

Landmark Forum Showcases What Collaboration Makes Possible

There were moments at the AWWI Wind-Wildlife Forum in November 2015 that no one in attendance will soon forget. Moments that represented significant milestones in the eight years of the wind industry, conservation and science organizations, agencies, and scientists working together.

One of these moments was when the Executive Director of the Sierra Club, Mike Brune, spoke. Looking around the room, Mike said that the time had come for the environmental community to be more propositional, rather than just oppositional, when it comes to renewable energy projects because of the urgency of climate change. Mike called for a new way of thinking and working by environmental organizations and renewable energy companies, as well as for wind companies to “step up on labor practices and wildlife issues.”

Mike’s words sent a ripple through the room. There was a sense that a new level of commitment to collaboration had been reached, opening up new possibilities as a result. This sense continued to grow when VP of Communications and Government Affairs for EDP Renewables, Roby Roberts, offered up a bold idea: that the wind industry could allocate much of the millions spent each year on post-construction monitoring to on-the-ground conservation. Again, this moment showed how trust and sustained partnerships make new ways of thinking possible that could create hugely positive benefits for wildlife and break new ground for how an industry operates.

These moments didn’t come out of nowhere. They were the result of AWWI’s role as a convener, bringing stakeholders together outside of formal policy development to discuss issues, build relationships and create ideas. Moments that are the result of CEO forums, research meetings, and countless conversations about how we can build out wind power in the United States while strongly protecting our wildlife. They were the result of trust and a shared agenda for wind and conservation.

Today, we’re thrilled that the collaborative approach that is at the heart of how AWWI works is yielding significant new ideas and solutions. If 20% of the nation’s energy is to be powered by wind by 2030, we must work together in ways that are unprecedented – and together as AWWI Partners, we are.

“We need a new way of thinking and working by environmental organizations and renewable energy companies. We also want to see wind companies step up on labor practices and wildlife issues. AWWI is an important part of achieving this goal.”

Mike Brune

Executive Director, Sierra Club

Many Thanks to Our Supporters

Founders, Champions, and Former Board Members

AWWI’s founding would not have been possible without the foresight, commitment, and financial support from an extraordinary group of wind developers and manufacturers, environmental and science organizations, wildlife management agencies, and individuals. In addition to the Founders, AWWI has benefited from the leadership, counsel, and engagement of many others in both the wind and wildlife sectors. To them, we extend our appreciation as well.

Individuals and Organizations in the Science and Environmental Community

Individuals and Companies from the Wind Industry

Individuals and Organizations in the Science and Environmental Community

Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies

Environmental Defense Fund

National Audubon Society

Natural Resources Defense Council

Sierra Club

The Nature Conservancy

Union of Concerned Scientists

Bob Barnes 

Barbara Boyle

Michael Bean

Jamie Rappaport Clark

Alex Daue

Michael Daulton

Pam Eaton

Roy Elicker

John Flicker

Sarah Friedman

Peter C. Frumhoff, Ph.D.

Deb Hahn

Ronald Helinski

Chris Hise

Chase Huntley

Kevin Knobloch

John Kostyack

Ginny Kreitler

Julia Levin

Alex Levinson

Joy Page

Allan Pollom

Jerome Powell

Jay Pruett

John Rogers

Donna Schneider

Larry Schweiger

Stacy Small-Lorenz, Ph.D.

Genevieve Thompson

Katie Umekubo

Jeff Vonk

Johanna Wald

Wayne Walker

Carl Zichella

Individuals and Companies from the Wind Industry

American Wind Energy Association

AES Wind Generation

Avangrid Renewables, LLC

BP Wind Energy

Clipper Windpower

EDF Renewable Energy (formerly enXco)

E.On Climate

GE Energy

EDP Renewables (formerly Horizon Wind Energy)

Renewable NRG Systems (formerly NRG Systems)

Pattern Energy Group

RES Americas

Vestas Americas

Amanda Abbott

Gabriel Alonso

John Anderson

Mike Azeka

Jan Blomstrann

Denise Bode

Robert “Hap” Boyd

Rene Braud

John Calaway

Seth Dunn

Jim Eisen

Declan Flanagan

Mike Garland

Bob Gates

Brandy Gibson

Rich Glick

Rick Greiner

Joe Grennan

Tristan Grimbert

Ned Hall

Mike Horn

Laurie Jodziewicz

Ann Jones-Weinstock

Andy Linehan

Ed Lowe

Bob Lukefahr

Kevin Lynch

Craig Mataczynski

Martin Mugica

Sara Parsons

Pam Poisson

Susan Reilly

David Reinke

Roby Roberts

Jerry Roppe

Dorthe Sherling-Nielson

Mike Skelly

Jason Thomas

Sara Tyler

David Van Hoogstraten

John VanDerZee

James Walker, Ph.D.

Sarah Webster

Stuart Webster

Tom Weis

Greg Wetstone

Patrick Woodson

Government

Robert Thresher

Wildlife Management Agencies

Kathy Boydston

Keith Sexson

Meet Jan Blomstrann

A Champion of the Environment, Wind Energy, and AWWI

A wind energy entrepreneur and passionate environmentalist, Jan Blomstrann has never shied away from thinking big. So when James Walker, Ph.D., approached Jan in 2008 with the idea of the American Wind Wildlife Institute, she jumped in with her leadership and personal support. Jan knew how challenging it would be to start a nonprofit organization with an approach and agenda as ambitious as AWWI’s, which is one of the reasons she decided to both join the Board and make a philanthropic investment in the effort. In addition to serving on the Board from 2009-2015, Jan served as AWWI’s Board Chair for 2011 and 2012.

“I am proud to support AWWI because I believe in the important work they do,” said Jan. “There’s so much myth and misinformation surrounding the development of wind energy. Most importantly to me, AWWI brings the major conservation and science groups in the country and corporate members of the wind industry to truly work together at the same table, produce strong science, and educate about wind-wildlife,” continued Jan. “This is incredibly innovative, and a model never seen before in any energy sector.”

“From day one, Jan has been a relentless champion of AWWI’s mission and innovative model,” said Abby Arnold, AWWI’s Executive Director. “She is a visionary and seasoned executive and philanthropist who has infused her energy and experience into AWWI. Jan served as AWWI’s Board Chair through an especially important time in the organization’s evolution, further underscoring her passion for the cause and fortitude as a leader and entrepreneur. We are incredibly grateful to Jan for her foresight, leadership, and generous personal investments in AWWI – she has been integral to AWWI’s success so far.”

Jan has been recognized for her many contributions to the advancement of renewable energy, including by the White House in 2012 as a Champion of Change.

Your Generosity Powers AWWI’s Unique Mission

The American Wind Wildlife Institute exists today because of the vision, leadership, and financial support of a diverse group of funders including: science and environmental organizations, government agencies, wind companies, manufacturers, and utilities, and individuals and family foundations. We thank you for your generosity.

2008-2014 Donors

Individual Donors and Foundations

Leadership Donors 

Anonymous Donor

Jan Blomstrann

Community Foundation for the National Capital Region

Vermont Community Foundation

Annual Donors

Taber Allison, Ph.D.

Abby Arnold

Jan Blomstrann

Rene Braud

Christina Calabrese

John Calaway

Scott Davis

Juliette Falkner

Anne  Flinn

Lauren Flinn

William Flinn

Peter C. Frumhoff, Ph.D.

Brandy Gibson

Joe Grennan

Pam and Tim Hayes

Melinda Hershey

Tom Hiester

Michael Horn

Ann Jones-Weinstock

John Kostyack

Stephen Krebs

Roby Roberts

Stacie Sears

Genevieve Thompson

Jeff Vonk

Johanna Wald

James Walker, Ph.D.

Stuart Webster

Government 

Department of Energy

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Science and Environmental Partners 

Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 

Defenders of Wildlife 

Environmental Defense Fund

National Wildlife Federation

Natural Resources Defense Council 

Sierra Club

The Nature Conservancy

The Wilderness Society  

Union of Concerned Scientists

Industry Partners 

Avangrid Renewables, LLC

Berkshire Hathaway Energy

BP Wind Energy

DTE Energy

Duke Energy Renewables

EDF Renewable Energy

EDP Renewables (Formerly Horizon Wind Energy)

GE Power & Water

Pattern Energy Group

Renewable NRG Systems (Formerly NRG Systems)  

RES Americas – Renewable Energy Systems   

SunEdison (Formerly First Wind)

Industry Friends 

AES Wind Generation

American Wind Energy Association

AWS Truepower

Clean Line Energy Partners 

Clipper Windpower

Element Power

Edison Mission Energy

Enel Green Power 

Infinity Wind Power

MAP Royalty

NextEra Energy

OwnEnergy (now EDF Renewable Energy)

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

Ridgeline Energy

Shell WindEnergy

Terra-Gen Power

TradeWind Energy

Vestas Americas

Sponsors* 

BHE Environmental (now POWER Engineers)

DeTect, Inc.

DT Bird

Duke Energy Renewables

EDP Renewables

H.T. Harvey and Associates

Invenergy

Merjent 

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

NextEra Energy

Normandeau Associates, Inc.

Pattern Energy Group

Stantec

SWCA Environmental Consultants

Tetra Tech  

U.S. Geological Survey

Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc.  

Wildlife Acoustics

*Support for the Wind Wildlife Research Meeting

Other

BP America Inc., Fabric of America Fund

Duke Energy Foundation

RES Americas Employee Matching Fund

2015 Donors

Individual Donors and Foundations

Leadership Donors 

Anonymous Donor

Jan Blomstrann

Vermont Community Foundation

Wright-Ingraham Institute

Annual Donors

Taber Allison, Ph.D.

Abby Arnold

Jan Blomstrann

Rene Braud

John Calaway

Dave Cowan

Scott Davis

Juliette Falkner

William Flinn

Lauren Flinn

Peter C. Frumhoff, Ph.D.

Garry George

Nathanael Greene

Tim Hayes

Tom Hiester

Eric Holst

Tom Kiernan

Jim Lyon

Kelley Myers

Roby Roberts

John Rogers

Terry Root, Ph.D.

Stacie Sears

Jacob  Susman

Randy Swisher

John VanDerZee

James Walker, Ph.D.

Stuart Webster

Justin Wheating

Government 

Department of Energy

National Renewable Energy Lab

Science and Environmental Partners 

Defenders of Wildlife

Environmental Defense Fund

National Audubon Society

National Wildlife Federation

Natural Resources Defense Council

The Nature Conservancy

The Wilderness Society

Union of Concerned Scientists

Industry Partners 

Avangrid Renewables, LLC

Berkshire Hathaway Energy

DTE Energy

Duke Energy Renewables

EDF Renewable Energy

EDP Renewables

Pattern Energy Group

Renewable NRG Systems

RES Americas 

SunEdison (Formerly First Wind)

Industry Friends 

American Wind Energy Association

BP Wind Energy

Clean Line Energy Partners

Enel Green Power

GE Power & Water

Infinity Wind Power

MAP Royalty

OwnEnergy (Now EDF Renewable Energy)

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

TradeWind Energy

Vestas Americas

Other

Anonymous Corporate Donor

Duke Energy Foundation Matching Gifts Program

RES Americas Employee Matching Fund

The listings above include in-kind gifts. If you have any questions about your listing, we inadvertently made an error in acknowledging your gift, or you would like a copy of AWWI’s audited financial statements, please contact ssears@awwi.org.

2015 Financials

Support and Revenue

Partners & Friends:

Wind Sector Companies, Science and Environmental Organizations, and Wildlife Management Agencies

$959,500

Individual Gifts & Grants

$160,578

Program Income

$89,098

In-Kind Donations

$22,787

Interest/Dividends & Other Income

$3,351

Prior Year Gift Income

$96,436

Total Support and Revenue:

$1,331,751

Expenses

Science for Policy & Practice

$404,096

Technological Innovation

$324,222

Information Exchange

$142,478

General & Administration

$271,838

Fundraising

$189,117

Total Expenses:

$1,331,751

Science for Policy & Practice

Technological Innovation

Information Exchange

*AWWI’s 2015 audited financials will be complete in mid-2016. Please check back then for the final statements.

“AWWI plays an essential role by bringing state and other wildlife managers’ voices to the intersection of wind and wildlife issues. AWWI has a strategic outreach and research agenda to meet the goals of its varied membership, from discussion of conservation and monitoring strategies to analysis of emerging and changing technologies.”

Kelley Myers

Iowa Department of Natural Resources Conservation & Recreation Division Administrator

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Science Advisors and Research Collaborators

Science Advisors

Ed Arnett, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership

Amanda Hale, Texas Christian University

Dale Strickland, Western Ecosystems Technology, Inc.

Douglas Johnson, U.S. Geological Survey

Manuela Huso, U.S. Geological Survey

Sidney Gauthreaux Jr., Clemson University

Research Collaborators

Kim Bay, Western Ecosystems Technology

Regina Bispo, ISPA – Instituto Universitário

Pete Bloom, Bloom Consulting

Clint Boal, Texas Tech University

Tom Cade, The Peregrine Fund

Jean Cochrane, Independent Consultant

Mike Collopy, University of Nevada-Reno

Dave Cowan, SunEdison

Dan Dalthorp, U.S. Geological Survey

Jay Diffendorfer, U.S. Geological Survey

Adam Duerr, West Virginia University

Wally Erickson, Western Ecosystems Technology

Joe Fargione, The Nature Conservancy

Chris Franson, U.S. Geological Survey

Cris Hein, Bat Conservation International

Grainger Hunt, The Peregrine Fund

Manuela Huso, U.S. Geological Survey

Todd Katzner, U.S. Geological Survey

Dylan Keon, Oregon State University

Joe Kiesecker, The Nature Conservancy

Mike Kochert, U.S. Geological Survey (retired)

Franzi Korner-Nievergelt, Oikostat and Swiss Ornithological Institute

Eric Lonsdorf, Franklin and Marshall College

Scott Loss, Oklahoma State University

Daniel Manier, U.S. Geological Survey

Chris McClure, The Peregrine Fund

Tricia Miller, West Virginia University

Brian Millsap, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Robert Murphy, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

David Nelson, University of Maryland

Leslie New, Washington State University

Ryan Nielson, Western Ecosystems Technology

Cherri Pancake, Oregon State University

Steve Pelletier, Stantec

David Pyke, U.S. Geological Survey

Paul Rabie, Western Ecosystems Technology

Patrick Redig, University of Minnesota

Bruce Rideout, San Diego Zoo

Don Ronning, Lite Enterprises

Jerry Roppe, Avangrid Renewables, LLC.

Carol Sanders-Reed, Kambur

Michael Schirmacher, Bat Conservation International

Ben Skipper, Angelo State University

Jeff Smith, H.T. Harvey & Associates

Bea Van Horne, U.S. Geological Survey

Rick Watson, The Peregrine Fund

Robert Wolpert, Duke University

Pat Zollner, Purdue University

AWWI engages with a multitude of stakeholders in our research efforts. If you see an error in the listing above, please contact ssears@awwi.org.

 

2016 Board & Staff

Board

Staff

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Photo Credits: Iberdrola Renewables Inc. NREL Pix (Dry Lake Wind Power Project); flickr alankrakauer (sage grouse); Tom Ryan, NREL (Bald Eagle); flickr Matthew O’Donnell (eastern tree bat); Monty Nicol (Erin Baerwald); Michael Halberstadt (Forum); Michael Halberstadt (Forum); iStock (turbines); Jan Blomstrann.